What Does Same-Sex FMLA Ruling Mean for Employers?

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What Does Same-Sex FMLA Ruling Mean for Employers?

What Does Same-Sex FMLA Ruling Mean for Employers?

Same-sex couples throughout the United States recently became eligible for FMLA benefits, and as an employer, you may wonder what this means for you and your business. Practically speaking, the change does not mean much. The Family and Medical Leave Act, also known as FMLA, “provides certain employees with up to 12 weeks of unpaid,… Read More

EEOC Suing Company for Requiring Employees to Speak English

EEOC Suing Company for Requiring Employees to Speak English

Is requiring employees to speak English a fair condition of employment within privately owned American companies?  The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission certainly does not think so. It filed a federal suit against Wisconsin Plastics Inc. for firing a group of Hmong and Hispanic workers in 2012, allegedly based on their inability to speak English, according to… Read More

Michigan “Right to Work” Law Upheld By the Courts

Michigan “Right to Work” Law Upheld By the Courts

Much to the chagrin of union leaders throughout the state, Michigan became the nation’s 24th state to pass right-to-work laws in 2013. The Michigan right to work law means it’s now illegal to make union membership a mandatory part of employment in the state of Michigan. The law specifically allowed those who were not in… Read More

Federal Law Prohibits Employment Discrimination Based on Genetics

Federal Law Prohibits Employment Discrimination Based on Genetics

Congress passed the Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act (GINA) in 2009. When the bill was signed into law, Sen. Ted Kennedy hailed it as the “first civil rights bill of the new century.” However, the dearth of claims filed under GINA since it became the law of the land calls into question its effectiveness as a… Read More

The ENDA and LGBT Workplace Discrimination

The ENDA and LGBT Workplace Discrimination

Equality is a fundamental principle in American constitutional law. Therefore, American workers are protected against discrimination on the basis of race, sex, or religion. However, despite the fact that more than eight million American workers identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered (LGBT), there is no federal law that prohibits employment discrimination on the basis… Read More

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